Gail Heminger Cunningham's  love of art began at an early age with her mother who shared her love of painting. Gail is a full time artist who works in watercolor, acrylics, collage and mixed media. 

Gail is a member of Trenholm Artists Guild and Seven Oaks Art League, where she has served as president, newsletter editor, membership chair and juried show chair.  In 2010, Gail won a Purchase Patron Award from the Fine Arts Division at the State Fair and also a Merit Award from the Trenholm Artists Guild for "Singing in the Rain". Juror John Hall, Professor of Studio Art at College of Charleston, made this statement about her painting: "Strong composition. Well organized and dynamic. I enjoyed the colored grays playing off against the small moments of pure color. More abstract, but reminiscent of Thiebauld’s compositions."  In 2010, Gail became a Member in Excellence of the South Carolina Watermedia Society.  

Gail has studied with many nationally known artists including Gerald Brommer, Linda Doll, Warren Taylor, Marilyn Phillis, Margaret Martin and Carole Barnes.  She has exhibited her paintings at many venues in the Columbia area and throughout the state. She is currently represented in Columbia, South Carolina at Village Artists at Village at Sandhill.

PRICES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

You may contact the artist at gacunningham@mindspring.com

 

 

Artist Statement

I put equal importance on the viewer's interpretation as I do my own, rarely being specific as to the art's meaning. The mystery is part of the appeal, it helps the viewer bring their own life experience to the art.  I love working in a variety of mediums to create multiple layers and textures in my work. I have been influenced by family and wonderfully creative friends who have supported me throughout this process. I believe my art has come full circle, back to the days of doodling with my mother at the kitchen table and trying to find recognizable shapes and creatures in our creations. I enjoy the process of  letting the paint flow, finding shapes and patterns and running with them. I am captured by the freedom of creating abstracts.